North Carolina bycatch, part 1

We were targeting Kentucky Warblers in Howell Woods, but a few other species seem to have missed that memo. Perhaps they wanted us to study their migratory routes, too.

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Or perhaps not.

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This Eastern Towhee did not experience anything remotely horrifying enough to justify his expression.

The Eastern Towhee was our largest bycatch, a powerful handful of a bird. A female Ruby-throated Hummingbird was our smallest.

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We also caught a female Indigo Bunting, only the barest hint of blue on her wrists to suggest the color for which her species is named.

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She liked us a lot.

The oddest bird we met, I submit, was the Swainson’s Warbler.

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This is a warbler with almost no color or pattern, a strangely angular body, and a meadowlark’s strong bill pasted onto its face. Why?

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Why not?

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A Hooded Warbler came along soon after to remind us what warblers usually look like.

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I was prepared to be knocked out by the beauty of the Hooded Warbler—it’s impossible to miss that huge black eye in the sunshine face. I was not expecting to be bowled over by our last visitor, a familiar grey bird that packs an entirely new level of personality when seen up close: the Tufted Titmouse.

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Oh who me?

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Yeah I’ve got a crest.

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And secret cinnamon sides; so?

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You’d better hope I don’t tell my friends about you.

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2 thoughts on “North Carolina bycatch, part 1

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